Mindfulness

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  • #9582
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster
    #9651
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    #9671
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    #9726
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster
    #9827
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    Because I have limited intelligence and little education,
    These verses are not the kind of poetry that delights the learned.
    But because I relied on the teachings of the sutras and the revered
    I am confident that The Practices of a Bodhisattva is sound.

    However, because it’s hard for a person with limited intelligence like me
    To fathom the depths of the great waves of the activity of bodhisattvas,
    I ask the revered to tolerate
    Any mistakes — contradictions, non sequiturs, and such.

    From the goodness of this work, may all beings,
    Through the supreme mind that is awake to what is ultimately and apparently true,
    Not rest in any limiting position — existence or peace:
    May they be like Lord All Seeing.

    Tog-me, the monk, a teacher of scripture and logic, composed this text in a cave near the town of Ngülchu Rinchen for his own and others’ benefit.

    A Summary of How an Awakening Being Behaves
    by Tog-me Zong-po (Thogs.med bzang.po, 1245-1369)

    http://www.unfetteredmind.org/37-practices-of-a-bodhisattva/0

    #9832
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster
    #9872
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    I think that how we perceive the world, how we conceive of it and think about it, is very interesting and important, particularly the locality where we live.  This is about the locality where I live.

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1751696X.2013.860278

    #9884
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    The study investigated the effects of a day of intensive mindfulness practice in a group of experienced meditators, compared to a group of untrained control subjects who engaged in quiet non-meditative activities. After eight hours of mindfulness practice, the meditators showed a range of genetic and molecular differences, including altered levels of gene-regulating machinery and reduced levels of pro-inflammatory genes, which in turn correlated with faster physical recovery from a stressful situation.

    http://preventdisease.com/news/13/120513_Researchers-Show-How-Mindfulness-Thoughts-Can-Induce-Specific-Molecular-Changes-Genes.shtml

    #9900
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    Plato compares philosophy with preparing for death (Phaedo 67cd) and its goal with becoming like god (Theaetetus 176b). This view of philosophy implies two doctrines central to the Platonic tradition: the immortality of the soul and the community (koinonia) of the human and divine. These ideas were not new with Plato nor did they die with him. It is the nature of the philosophical endeavor to borrow and transform the ideas of others and to pass these ideas on for others to use and adapt. Plato is arguably the single most important ancient Greek thinker, although his strength lies not merely in his innovation but also, and perhaps especially, in his critical understanding of the philosophical tradition. The Golden Chain provides important texts in the history of Platonism. It begins, perhaps startlingly but certainly correctly, with excerpts about Pythagoras, moves through the Pythagorean tradition, then comes to Plato himself, and continues with excerpts from the major Neoplatonist writers. What unfolds is an evolution of a philosophy, a Platonic philosophy, one that starts before Plato is born and continues to grow after his death—and indeed well beyond the times and writings of the pagan Neoplatonists presented here. We do not know much about Pythagoras. Given his fame and large numbers of followers, that may seem strange. We know of multiple biographies of him (four of which are excerpted in Part I, below), but they are all late and suspect. As is the case with all famous individuals, the history of Pythagoras took on a life of its own. Stories of miracles, of divine genealogy, and of superhuman wisdom became associated with the philosopher. Making the matter murkier, others began writing treatises under his name. (See the works collected in Part II, below.) It is therefore very difficult to separate truth from fiction, Pythagoras’ doctrine from later additions. This wealth of information, however, is not so troubling. All philosophy evolves over time, but there are kernels of original doctrines present. We may not know precisely what Pythagoras taught his students, but we can be sure that his teachings included the soul’s immortality, the cycle of birth, and the existence and beneficence of the gods.

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Golden-Chain-Pythagorean-Philosophy/dp/0941532615

    #9916
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    Devil Worship in the Middle Ages

    by Denise Horton

    The chaos and upheaval that characterized European society in the Middle Ages served

    as a breeding ground for many peculiar ideas and events. One of the most interesting is

    undoubtedly the explosion of witch hunts and related activity. This “witch mania”

    eventually spread throughout most of the continent leaving behind it a trail of death and

    distorted ideas that made an impression upon popular opinion which is still felt in the

    20th century.

    http://www.loyno.edu/~history/journal/1986-7/documents/DevilWorshipintheMiddleAges.pdf

    #9921
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    #9922
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    #9923
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    #9940
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    An Encyclopaedia of Tibetan Buddhism

    http://www.rigpawiki.org/index.php?title=Main_Page

    #9953
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster
    #9959
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    This is fun

    we compare most of the popular translations of Sun Tzu’s The Art of War to give you an idea of how translations vary.

    http://scienceofstrategy.org/main/content/comparing-english-translations

    #9989
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    Unlike other sports and exercise programs, the martial arts train the whole person—body, spirit, and mind. Down through the millennia, the knowledge on which the martial arts are based—known in China as theBing-fa—was suppressed. Today, most of those who practice martial arts are unfamiliar with these principles except in how they have become embodied in martial arts practice.

    Martial arts are different because they are designed for self-defense and self-development. They exploit a loophole in the natural law. Nature says that the strong dominate the weak and the quick beat the slow. The martial arts teach that through the use of knowledge and training, a warrior can transform a stronger opponent into a weaker one.

    This loophole was first discovered and explained in a text written 2,500 years ago. Today, we know this work as Sun Tzu’s The Art of War. The Chinese title is Sunzi Bing-fa, which literally means “Master Sun’s Martial Arts.” The stateless warrior named Sun Wu of Qi grew up in a family of mercenaries, learning from birth all the challenges of battle. His work explained for the first time that what people thought of as power—size, strength, and wealth—were not real power but only the illusion of power. Those who understood the true nature of power could easily defeat these larger foes by leveraging their supposed strengths against them.

    Sun Wu proved his philosophy as a commander. He was hired by a poor, semibarbaric kingdom called Wu. Training the world’s first civilian army, Sun Wu led his forces to conquer all the larger, richer, and more technologically advanced kingdoms of the Yang-tze river valley.

    Sun Tzu’s success led to the emulation of his methods throughout the states of China after his death. The use of citizen armies created wide access to weapons and martial arts training. Professional mercenary families gave rise to history’s first professional martial artists. The first such martial artists are introduced in the Spring and Summer Annals of Wu and Yuewhen the old man Yuan Gong meets the young swordswoman Yue Nu in battle. These early martial artists eventually became demigods in the Chinese pantheon.

    Around 298 BC, the historian Zhuang Zi recorded that life in the state of Zhoa had become prosperous because of the practice of martial arts using the sword. King Wen of Zhoa invited more than 3,000 sword martial artists to practice against one another in his court. Zhuang Zi said that Sun Tzu’s theory had been incorporated into the martial arts techniques of both offense and defense and of both armed and unarmed combat. Sun Tzu’s ideas were the fundamental principles in the Book of Sword Fighting and Internal Boxing (Nei kia Quan), both published late in the Warring States period.

    Sun Tzu’s methods, originally taught in the context of larger wars, were now seen as the key to individual contests. In armed contests, Sun Tzu’s lessons on positioning are echoed in Zhuang Zi’s description of the key methods used. “The best sword fighters,” he wrote, “pretended to be without preparation as if offering an opening to the enemy. They then gained mastery by striking only after the enemy has struck.”

    Sun Tzu’s descendent, Sun Bing (Sun Ping) repopularized the work of Sun Wu. Eventually this teaching made its way to a young nobleman named Ying Zheng. Using the ancient secrets of the Bing-fa, Ying Zheng became the ruler of his kingdom, Qin, and began conquering neighboring kingdoms. By 221 BC, Ying became the first emperor of all of China and changed his name to Qin Shi Huangdi.

    From that time, the Bing-fa was kept secret and passed down only to those of royal blood. While practicing theBing-fa themselves, various Chinese emperors promoted other, less aggressive philosophies—first Taoism and later Buddhism—in connection with the martial arts. Though its complete philosophy was hidden, martial arts practice took the form of a physical exercise known as Tai Chi Chuan(The Grand Ultimate Fist) that became popular in China in about the third century AD. By the fifth century, the physical science was being advanced by monks at the Buddhist monastery of Shao Lin, who may have received a secret copy of the text of the Bing-fa from a member of the royal family of China, who were now Buddhists. This was the beginning of what was known as Kung-Fu (literally, “hard work”). The philosophy was spread both through armed combat and unarmed combat (since peasants were denied arms) through all of Asia.

    http://scienceofstrategy.org/main/content/martial-arts-and-sun-tzu

    #10045
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster
    Hathor's Priestess - Tattoos

    The Tattooed Priestess’ of Hathor

    – See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/myths-legends/tattooed-priestess-hathor-001122#sthash.wL0MqrQE.dpuf

    #10078
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster
    #10079
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    #10091
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    #10096
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster
    #10099
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    This article explores initial findings and the implications of neuroscientific research on meditation. Meditation is conceptualized here as a family of complex emotional and attentional regulatory training regimes developed for various ends, including the cultivation of well-being and emotional balance. The review focuses on the mental processes and the underlying neural circuitry that are critically involved in two styles of meditation. One style, Focused Attention (FA) meditation, entails the voluntary focusing of attention on a chosen object. The other style, Open Monitoring (OM) meditation, involves non-reactive monitoring of the content of experience from moment to moment. We discuss the potential regulatory functions of these practices on attention and emotion processes and their putative long-term impact on the brain and behavior.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2693206/

    #10100
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    Dharma Overground Forum meditation wiki, good info

    http://www.dharmaoverground.org/web/guest/dharma-wiki

    #10172
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    It occurred to me then to ask, does the Tantrika mourn the coming of the Kali Yuga?

    http://realitysandwich.com/215418/who-mourns-the-coming-of-the-kali-yuga/?u=57970

    #10285
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    #10332
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    Shinto is an ancient faith of forests and snow-capped mountains. It sees the divine in rocks and streams, communing with spirit worlds through bamboo twigs and the evergreen sakaki tree. Yet it is also the manicured suburban garden and the blades of grass between cracks in city paving stones. Structured around ritual cleansing, Shinto contains no concept of sin. It reveres ancestors, but thinks little about the afterlife, asking us to live in, and improve, the present. Central to Shinto is Kannagara: intuitive acceptance of the divine power contained in all living things. Dai Shizen (Great Nature) is the life force with which we ally ourselves through spiritual practice and living simply. This is not asceticism, but an affirmation of all aspects of life. Musubi (organic growth) provides a model for reconciling ancient intuition with modern science, modern society with primal human needs. Shinto is an unbroken indigenous path that now reaches beyond its native Japan. It has special relevance to us a

    http://www.amazon.com/o/ASIN/1846944384/

    #10340
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    A Secret Teaching.

    Lay on your back in your bed. You can do this as you first wake up, or as you are about to sleep, or whenever you want, but perhaps the best time is in the small hours when things are very quiet and it is easy to concentrate without any distraction.

    With eyes closed, look inside and visualise your internal body, until you can feel the whole of you inner being, strongly and clearly. Just rest and retain that, without any thought or letting attention wander. You just see and feel yourself as that being-ness, a conscious awareness filling your form. It can be sensed or perceived as slightly similar to visual light, or just as a felt presence. It doesn’t really matter, so long as it is the whole body and strongly felt, and maintained for several minutes without any wavering.

    Basically, what you are perceiving is the thing that’s not there when you are dead. It’s the vital animate sensual you that is directly aware of its existence, but without any thought or intellectual analytical function in operation.

    Then get up, or go to sleep, or whatever you want to do.

    Next, you go somewhere else. It could just be another room in your house, but I used the end of my walk with my dog, which is several hundred yards away.

    When I stop to turn, and before I begin walking back, I stand and do the exact same exercise I have just described until I cannot tell any difference to when I was in my bed.

    I then chose several other points around my home and did the same thing.

    Once I had established this exercise strongly, I went to the next step, which was to be at all those points simultaneously.

    Wtf ?

    Try it for yourself. See what happens. Seems to me this breaks ALL THE RULES.

     

    #10341
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    The paramount reason why the material scientist is incapable of duplicating achievements of the mediaeval alchemists-although he follow every step carefully and accurately- is that the subtle element which comes out of the nature of the illuminated and regenerated alchemical philosopher is missing in his experimentation.

    http://realitysandwich.com/215566/the-alchemy-and-the-ecstasy/?u=57970

    #10342
    ulvfugl
    Keymaster

    You see, the scientists, and the Western philosophers, and all the intellectuals of Western culture, all THINK, and they string ideas together and they investigate concepts and they put together theories… but none of them understand what I have just described above, which is something QUITE DIFFERENT.

    Here we have a very good example of the typical Western approach, where the intellect applies the cerebral, analytical approach, trying to comprehend something, and ‘materialist convictions’ means walking around blindfolded.

    To reject gods and spirits is easy: just bully them away in the name of science.

    But to accept them, or at least our experiences of them, and yet give them a scientific explanation: there’s a task worthy of our art. It demands that we look them in the eye and take them seriously, while standing absolutely firm in our materialist convictions.

    http://www.meltingasphalt.com/neurons-gone-wild/

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